• This book clarifies the pathology and genetics of muscle disease for pathologists, clinicians, geneticists and researchers to aid in the diagnosis and management of patients. Organized around the 'motor unit' concept, this book presents the latest understanding of muscle disease, and how this can help identify new treatments.

  • Most textbooks on neurodegenerative disorders have used a classification scheme based upon either clinical syndromes or anatomical distribution of the pathology. In contrast, this book looks to the future and uses a classification based upon molecular mechanisms, rather than clinical or anatomical boundaries. Major advances in molecular genetics and the application of biochemical and immunocytochemical techniques to neurodegenerative disorders have generated this new approach. Throughout most of the current volume, diseases are clustered according to the proteins that accumulate within cells (e.g. tau, -synuclein and TDP-43) and in the extracellular compartments (e.g. -amyloid and prion proteins) or according to a shared pathogenetic mechanism, such as trinucleotide repeats, that are a feature of specific genetic disorders. Chapters throughout the book conform to a standard lay-out for ease of access by the reader and are written by a panel of International ExpertsSince the first edition of this book, major advances have been made in the discovery of common molecular mechanisms between many neurodegenerative diseases most notably in the frontotemporal lobar degenerations (FTLD) and motor neuron disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.This book will be essential reading for clinicians, neuropathologists and basic neuroscientists who require the firm up-to-date knowledge of mechanisms, diagnostic pathology and genetics of Neurodegenerative diseases that is required for progress in therapy and management.

  • Ghrelin, the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor, is critical in the control of food intake and energy balance. The ghrelin receptors are now known to have important physiological properties as modulators of growth hormone release, appetite, glucose homeostasis, metabolism, immune function, neurotransmitter activity, cognitive function and neurodegeneration. Bringing all of this information together in the first comprehensive text on the topic, Ghrelin in Health and Disease provides a state-of-the-art synthesis of the latest work in this area for physicians and physician-scientists. This volume addresses the unique property of ghrelin as a modulator of function. Such a property provides potential utility for safe intervention in a wide variety of disease states. Indeed as we learn more about the basic physiology of ghrelin, the potential for treating new disease targets emerge requiring validation in the clinic. Each chapter in this volume is authored by a leading investigator in the field. The introductory chapter sets the background for the book and provides a superb overview of the relevance of ghrelin to physiology, describing how the discovery of ghrelin has prompted us to completely rethink traditional physiology. The authors conclude their chapters by critically addressing the future translational aspects of ghrelin biology and outlining what key basic research and clinical questions remain to be addressed. An invaluable resource, Ghrelin in Health and Disease distinguishes itself as the first comprehensive title covering all of the molecular and clinical issues relating to ghrelin and advancing our clinical understanding of obesity, growth, and reproductive pathogenesis.

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